Tips from Waikiki Locals

#1
  1. Don’t pickup UBER on Kalakaua, it’s hard for them to stop and find you.

  2. Lewers St. is sketchy after 3am, stay together.

  3. Ask valet/bell staff before you do anything. They are full of knowledge and welome questions.

  4. Don’t leave stuff unattended, whether on the beach or at a lunch table. The most common theft is when people go to swimming and leave their valuables on the beach.

  5. Leave your valuables in your hotel safe. Your car trunk is not a safe depotit box.

  6. Don’t go to Chinatown after dark.

  7. Do a circle island tour early in your trip to get a snapshot of the entire island (either self-drive or tour).

  8. Be really careful riding mopeds, we have lots of bad drivers. “You can do everything right and still end up in a hospital.”

  9. Cheaper food is found on Kuhio Ave. (parallel to Kalakaua Ave, the main strip).

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#2

If you are new to Hawaii do not under estimate the power of sunblock! The latitude of Hawaii makes the suns rays stronger than almost anywhere on the mainland.

The weather may feel like perfection but it is so easy to get a very bad sunburn.

Find that perfect balance of time spent in the sun and nicely applied sunblock. Instead of a viscous burn you’ll be heading home with a sexy tan to make the family jealous :smiley:

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#3

That’s really good @Saralives, and you can get locally made reef-safe sunscreen by the checkout counter at Kai Coffee in the Hyatt Regency, directly across the street from Waikiki Beach.

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#4

Aloha, I like above in the post about theft. Hawaii is still one of the safest places to visit in America but is known for local boys grabbing unattended bags off the beaches & running with your stuff :confused: Always ask other’s to watch your stuff or leave someone in your group back while you go for a dip in the ocean or a swim :slight_smile: better safe than sorry. Only take what you need and the rest should be safely locked away in your hotel room. Also leaving your rental car Always leave what small stuff you don’t need with you while going for a hike, swimming, shopping ect locked securely in the trunk and not visible in your car. If they don’t see it they probably won’t want it :slight_smile: This doesn’t happen all the time but like earlier stated better safe than sorry :wink: cheers, Kevo

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#5

When you park your car, try your best to make sure your car is visible from the establishment you’re visiting.

One time I stopped for shave ice along a country road close to Kualoa Ranch and my car’s windows were popped, and it was because there was a 12 passenger van between my car and the shave ice shop, so my car was hidden.

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#6

Never turn your back to the ocean…

Whenever tourists see big waves, a lot of them walk up to the water, turn around and pose for a photo. This is EXTREMELY dangerous because an unexpected wave can come out of nowhere and smash you.

If the sand is wet, that means a wave was there recently. Waves come in sets, usually every 15-20 mins, and although the place where you’d like to stand for a photo may have not been hit by waves the past few minutes- if the sand is wet a wave recently was there and is probably coming back.

Also, check with life guards before going in. Any life guard will always prefer questions over having to go save you. You’re never bothering them if you have questions, they’ll appreciate it.

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